[SAVED] – 10 Lessons from 10 Years of AWS

2018/01/23

Architecting and designing at Cloud Scale? Learn from this guy.

AWS have their well architected framework of course however this guy goes further than the AWS pillars and into the whys and wherefores in some detail.

via 10 Lessons from 10 Years of AWS (part 1) – Hacker Noon

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An AWS Monitoring Primer

2018/01/23

A very useful mind map of AWS monitoring capabilities, their relationships and purposes.

via AWS Monitoring Primer | cloudonaut


Looking to get started coding?

2018/01/19

Have a read of the knowledge Ashley McNamara has distilled via ashleymcnamara/learn_to_code: Resources for budding developers


Interesting Railways Documents

2018/01/17

Putting this information up here for future keeping. I seem to need to keep referring to these from time to time and it will be handy to have them saved somewhere.

PIR for RailCorp (Now SydneyTrains) Sydenham Signal Box Failure on April 12th.

110429-Signal_System_Report

Presentation on the Stabilisation of the Melbourne Train Control System

Legacy Train Control System Stabilisation


Technet landing page for Windows Event Forwarding information.

2018/01/11

Probably more information about Windows Event Forwarding (WEF) than you will ever need.

via Windows Event Forwarding – TechNet Articles – United States (English) – TechNet Wiki


IPv6 with Synology RT2600ac via HE tunnel

2017/12/31

Very quick and dirty steps required to get IPv6 over IPv4 working in your Synology RT2600ac.

Head over to https://tunnelbroker.net and create an account. Create a tunnel service and note down the following details:

IPv6 Tunnel Endpoints

  • Server IPv4 Address
  • Server IPv6 Address
  • Client IPv4 Address
  • Client IPv6 Address
  • Routed IPv6 Prefix

Open the SRM admin page open the “Network Centre” app.

Select “Internet”. Under the “Connection” tab click the “IPv6 setup” button. Select the following settings:

  • IPv6 Setup: 6in4
  • IPv6 Address: {CLIENT IPv6 ADDRESS AS ABOVE}
  • Prefix Length: 64
  • Prefix: {ROUTED IPv6 PREFIX AS ABOVE} You dont need to include the trailing /64. Its already entered for you.
  • Remote server IPv4 address: {SERVER IPv4 ADDRESS AS ABOVE}

Press “Okay”.

Back in the “Network Centre” app, select “Local Network”. Under the “IPv6” tab, tick the box to enable IPv6 and select your “Prefix” from the drop down menu. Press Apply.

Now onto validating and testing.

Back in the “Network Centre” app, click on “Status”. Next to the “Internet Connection” heading, click the little drop down and select IPv6. It should say “Connected”.

Finally, check a client machine in your local network and make sure it has an IPv6 address auto-assigned. From that machine browse to http://ipv6-test.com/

 


Missing Instant Hotspot on MacOS

2017/12/21

One problem that keeps coming back on my MacBook Pro is that the Instant Hotspot option in the WiFi menu (in the menu bar) disappears.

Don’t confuse this with the Personal Hotspot feature of your phone. Instant Hotspot is part of the Continuity suite that uses your AppleID to make your iPhone’s hotspot feature available to your Mac even if the iPhone has the Personal Hotspot turned off.

After spending some time googling around for solutions to the missing option I worked out that I had to be searching for “Instant Hotspot” instead. I then started to get somewhere.

The fix that worked for me was step three from here.

I had to sign out of iCloud on my Mac and then sign back in. I didn’t have to do it on the iPhone.

Ive hit this issue three times now. No idea what the cause was tbh.